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Havoc to Halo Dog Training

Havoc to Halo Dog Training I strive to improve the dog/handler relationship by assisting dog owners with many different behavio

Operating as usual

05/03/2020

Thought of the day!

Great info on what “socialization” really means
03/04/2020
How to socialize your new puppy

Great info on what “socialization” really means

The last post was about WHEN to start socializing your puppy and now we will cover HOW. Both of these are equally important. This process will help your puppy grow up to be a balanced dog who doesn…

02/21/2020

😂🤷‍♀️
#RHOZ

Timeline photos
02/21/2020

Timeline photos

Timeline photos
02/19/2020

Timeline photos

🙌🏼#HaileySays 💭

Some great FACTUAL information about prong collars.
02/19/2020

Some great FACTUAL information about prong collars.

Let's Talk About... the Prong Collar. Facts, not emotions:

The prong, or pinch, collar was first patented by Herm Sprenger in the late 1800s, and the design has evolved over the decades with improved knowledge, experience, and materials. It should be noted that Herm Sprenger (*not* "Springer") are one of only a very small handful of prong collar manufacturers that reputable trainers recommend, and arguably the best.

The collar itself:

The individual prongs themselves are angled in and blunt at the ends, NEVER sharp. They are not designed to stab like a needle, or injure the dog. Due to the mechanical design, pressure is distributed evenly around the neck, and this pressure is felt far more readily than that of a choke/check chain, or flat collar. Ergo, less pressure is required to be used by the handler. This is particularly useful for handlers who have strength or mobility issues, or who have very large dogs. Also important to observe is that there is a martingale chain that connects each side of the collar, which prevents the collar from tightening excessively or dangerously, as can happen with a choke or check chain that is not used appropriately.

The mechanics of the collar, as explained by a mechanical engineer:

F = force applied by the handler.

FA, FB, FC etc = force applied on dog's neck. The tip exerts the force in opposite direction of pull. This is because of the lever effect created by the fulcrum (shown in the red circle).

Now the important part: anatomy, not physics.
A dog’s neck is sensitive at the throat and strong at the side and back. FE is force applied at neck and FB & FC are force applied on side of neck.

Now FA = F cos (angle made by FA and F); similarly, FB, FC etc. If you look at a trigonometry book, the greater the angle between F and the direction of resultant force (FA, FB etc), the lesser is the force. So you can see the force on the neck/throat is almost zero. And the force on the side of neck is almost equal to what you apply.

Please do bear in mind that this post is about the science behind the prong collar - not your *feelings*. If you don't like this particular tool, it's pretty simple: don't use it. But also bear in mind that, if you haven't ever used it, then your opinion of it is based on nothing more than emotion and/or hearsay. If you are triggered by this post, ask yourself why - based on *fact* :-)

And finally, always please remember: TOOLS DON'T TRAIN DOGS; TRAINING TRAINS DOGS! If your trainer puts one of these on your dog to "teach it to walk nicely to Heel", I would suggest firing them and finding a trainer who understands how to teach Handler Awareness, the Step Sit, and actually train the dog. If your dog will only walk to Heel when it is wearing equipment (of any kind), it's not trained :-)

Thank you for reading!

02/18/2020

Impulse control is such an important thing to train your dog. I do this with Halo and Liam every time I let them outside, or through any doorway for that matter. Repetition and slowly extending the length of time is key.

When many people think of a “reward” for their dog, they only think of food, toys, or praise. I know that simply going outside is a HUGE reward in itself, so that is all I use to reward this kind of training.

Timeline photos
02/17/2020

Timeline photos

“Using an ecollar will shut down your dog”.
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It’s something I believed to be true until I saw for myself what proper use of this tool can look like.
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I had been led to believe that this tool would electrocute my dog, would cause her severe pain, that she would look like she was behaving but in reality she’d be terrified for her life. Of course I wouldn’t use THAT on my dog!
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This is the rhetoric that exists around remote collars.
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Because of this, the first time I felt the stim of a professional grade remote collar on my own hand... I laughed.
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I laughed because it was not a shock or a “punch in the head” as a R+ trainer once called it. It was a tickle. A sensation similar to a tens machine for physical therapy. I had to dial up to a 16 to feel anything at all, and when I did, it was just a weird tickle. And Cooper? She works on a level 4-6 most days. A level most humans can’t even feel.
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We worked on learning the language of a remote collar for over a year. I was told that people who use ecollars were lazy and yet here we were, proofing all commands on a long lead with food rewards before even dreaming of layering over the remote collar. We worked HARD, long hours, weeks months and years under the supervision of a professional taking every precaution to be sure we were doing things right. It didn’t feel very lazy to me. Still doesn’t.
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And because we were so careful and so consistent, and so in tune with our dog, what we got was far from the “shut down” dog I had been told we’d get. I got a dog that was so clear on what we were asking for, so excited that she understood what we wanted, that her tail never once stopped wagging when she recalled for her reward. It was like what once has been a muffled game of telephone was now perfectly clear words to her.
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We got a dog whose world grew larger. She could come hiking with us. She could run like a dog, smell a world beyond a 6’ leash’s length, all with the certainty and security that she would recall perfectly every single time we asked her.
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Most people who use ecollars will never tell you you should use one. We know that that is a decision that only you and your trainer can make. We’ll never tell you that it’s a fit for every dog, and that you should do away with your food rewards and use the ecollar instead. We’ll never push the tool. Because we know it’s hard work, and we know that it isn’t a one size fits all solution. We know using this tool correctly is paramount, and that not everyone does, and because of that, it is a controversial tool.
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And we know that despite this work, some people will look at your $200 ecollar on your dog you’ve spent years training with disgust because of something they read online.
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The point of this post isn’t to change anyone’s mind- far from it. It’s to express how positive our experience has been with this tool, and how grateful we are to have worked with people who have given us a more objective view of it.
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We wrote a long post about our decision to use ecollar on our blog if you’re curious: https://coopertakesbrooklyn.com/blog/whats-the-deal-with-the-e-collar (thanks Canine Cohen Dog Training and Behavior Modification and Tyler Muto - Dog Trainer, Speaker, Coach)
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And if you’re not and think we’re terrible people or that we’re wrong and you’re right? That’s ok too. We still wish you the absolute best with whatever methods you’re using with your dog, because at the end of the day, all we’re looking to do is make a better world for our dogs. I think we can all agree on that.

Timeline photos
02/08/2020

Timeline photos

02/08/2020

Ecollars are such a wonderful tool, if you know how to use them properly and have a quality one. Liam and Halo have both been through ecollar training, which is why they are able to enjoy this kind of freedom! They are not evil torture devices, and I’m pretty sure you can tell that my dogs are not miserable or fearful while wearing them. Contact me if you would like to learn more!

The Dog Park Is Bad, Actually
02/07/2020
The Dog Park Is Bad, Actually

The Dog Park Is Bad, Actually

Dog parks may seem like great additions to the community, but they’re rife with problems — for you, and for your dog. Here’s what to know before you go.

Here’s a pretty good chart for those of you with potty training puppies!
01/28/2020

Here’s a pretty good chart for those of you with potty training puppies!

This is pretty well done!

01/24/2020

More progress!!! This has absolutely been our biggest feat...and this is the case with a lot of high drive or working breeds

01/22/2020
01/22/2020
static1.squarespace.com

There are so many people out there that have crating issues with their dogs, whether it be separation anxiety and the destruction that comes with it, or if they’re continuously having accidents in their crate without any obvious explanation. This is a method I came across recently and wanted to share. I have not tried it myself, but there are many that have had great success with it. Definitely worth a shot for those of you that are dealing with issues like these!

https://static1.squarespace.com/static/53e3ada9e4b0c07eac3c9284/t/5b547950758d4613def40cc6/1532262736719/SeparationAnxietyandStraw_MGoldberg.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2kjEIZVDVMfgq78Rr919nLHAf-EZrLivd2dgejaQ3jGT0Rrcf0LmTm5LE

01/22/2020
Photos from Amani K9's post
01/22/2020

Photos from Amani K9's post

01/21/2020

Working with Halo on his “off switch” (being calm in the house) we’re slowly but surely getting there. Don’t mind my tiny training apprentice 😂

01/20/2020

Thanks to everyone that liked my new page!! I’ll continue updating it and start adding some material that I think could be helpful to everyone. Feel free to PM me, or post any questions that you may have for me about your dogs and I will do my best to help you out. If you are a current or previous client of mine, please leave a rating or review when you get a chance, it would be greatly appreciated!!

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Lawrence, KS
66046

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