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Cold Noses, Warm Hearts

Cold Noses, Warm Hearts Cold Noses, Warm Hearts Rescue, located in Goleta, CA, is a non-profit animal rescue group focusing on placing animals in their forever homes, regardless of where they are from.

To adopt or foster, please call us and ask for Ciera or Tera (805) 964-2446.

Operating as usual

03/02/2022

How You Can Protect Your Dog & Cat From Coyotes

We're seeing more posts about coyotes in Santa Barbara, including city limits. With their habitats and food sources shrinking, coyotes are venturing closer to our neighborhoods and homes. Our cats and dogs can make an easy meal for these canine natives. Here are some ways you can protect your dog from coyote attacks, both at home and while you’re out enjoying nature.

Don’t Leave Your Small Dog Outside Unsupervised Day or Night
If you’re not around to keep an eye on your dog, it’s best to leave him indoors where a coyote can’t get him, especially if you don’t have good fencing.

Coyote-Proof Fencing
Speaking of fencing, you should invest in one that’s solid, at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, since coyotes are amazing diggers. At the top, you need to put something that will stop even the most athletic coyote. This could be barbed wire or a tube of PVC pipe (its slick, round shape makes it almost impossible for a coyote to grip). You can also create an overhang on the outside of the fence. Finally, you can install coyote rollers, which are 4-foot aluminum rods that spin when a coyote tries to grip them, preventing an animal from climbing over. And unlike barbed wire or PVC pipe, coyote rollers aren’t ugly to look at and are usually accepted by homeowners’ associations.

NEVER intentionally feed a coyote.

Don’t keep pet food outside.

If you have fruit trees, pick up fallen fruit so as to not let it rot on the ground. Coyotes are very opportunistic feeders.

Light up Your Yard at Night
Another backyard tip is to install motion-sensor lights that are pointed outside your fence line. That way, if a coyote does come around, the light will turn on before he gets into your yard. The light will make most coyotes turn back.

Pick up Poop
Your dog’s feces can attract coyotes to your property, so keeping your yard or fields clear of poop can help lower the risk of attracting one. They will also eat fallen fruit, so picking up any windfalls is a good idea. Don’t leave trash outside in bags and make sure all garbage can lids are secure and cannot be tipped over.

Coyote Vests
Coyote vests are made for small dogs and have a Kevlar neck collar armed with 1-inch spikes and spikes down the back, making it hard for coyotes to get a bite. If you have a small dog, these vests may provide good protection in coyote country.

Coyote Protection on Walks
The coyote vest mentioned above is great for your dog to wear on a walk if you’re in an area where you might encounter one. Keeping your dog on leash is also safer, since most coyotes are wary of people and won’t attack your dog if he’s close to you. Bringing something along that makes a loud noise — a whistle, bell, horn, etc. — is another good way to scare off a lingering coyote.

Remember that even if coyotes don’t attack your dog, they carry and transmit many diseases and parasites, including rabies, distemper, parvovirus, hepatitis, mange, fleas, worms, and ticks. So, keeping them out of your neighborhood is something that should be on everyone’s radar. Neighbors should always post coyote sightings. Together, you can keep your dogs (and other pets) safe.

Don’t become indifferent… if you see a coyote in your yard or neighborhood ALWAYS haze them away. Do so completely, and remind your neighbors of the importance of doing the same.

Keep cats indoors. Always is safest, but at least between the dusk and dawn hours (when coyotes tend to be most active).

Yes, coyotes are an important part of the ecosystems they inhabit, But when you start seeing them in your yard, on your street, or generally in your neighborhood — it does make one think about their presence just a little bit more.

01/30/2022

Who else was taught to always offer their hand to strange dogs before petting them? 🤚
Although the intention behind this idea is good, it’s actually bad information that can result in serious consequences. Why?

❌ dogs have very powerful senses of smell. If they can smell cancer inside someone’s body, they can smell your child from a few feet away.
❌ if a dog is nervous to meet you, sticking a hand out may be what pushes them over the edge. If they feel the need to escalate to biting, an outreached hand is a very easy target.

So what should you teach kids to do instead?
✅ learn about dog body language so that you can teach them what a relaxed and friendly dog looks like
✅ when they see a dog with friendly body language, teach them to “be a tree” and wait for the dog to approach them first
✅ if they begin petting a dog, teach them to do a consent check after the first few pets: stop petting and see if the dog solicits more. This is a great way to teach your child about their own bodily autonomy too!
✅ if it’s a dog they’ll be seeing often or living with, teach them hands-off ways to train or play with the dog

We often carry the lessons learned in childhood throughout our adult life. Let’s make them safe ones!

Credit: Teach Yourself Dog Training
#dvshr #teachyourchildren

Courtesy Post, NOT a Cold Noses, Warm Hearts dog
01/20/2022

Courtesy Post, NOT a Cold Noses, Warm Hearts dog

01/13/2022

How You Can Protect Your Dog & Cat From Coyotes

We're seeing more posts about coyotes in Santa Barbara, including city limits. With their habitats and food sources shrinking, coyotes are venturing closer to our neighborhoods and homes. Our cats and dogs can make an easy meal for these canine natives. Here are some ways you can protect your dog from coyote attacks, both at home and while you’re out enjoying nature.

Don’t Leave Your Small Dog Outside Unsupervised Day or Night
If you’re not around to keep an eye on your dog, it’s best to leave him indoors where a coyote can’t get him, especially if you don’t have good fencing.

Coyote-Proof Fencing
Speaking of fencing, you should invest in one that’s solid, at least 6-feet tall, and buried in the ground at least 18 inches, since coyotes are amazing diggers. At the top, you need to put something that will stop even the most athletic coyote. This could be barbed wire or a tube of PVC pipe (its slick, round shape makes it almost impossible for a coyote to grip). You can also create an overhang on the outside of the fence. Finally, you can install coyote rollers, which are 4-foot aluminum rods that spin when a coyote tries to grip them, preventing an animal from climbing over. And unlike barbed wire or PVC pipe, coyote rollers aren’t ugly to look at and are usually accepted by homeowners’ associations.

NEVER intentionally feed a coyote.

Don’t keep pet food outside.

If you have fruit trees, pick up fallen fruit so as to not let it rot on the ground. Coyotes are very opportunistic feeders.

Light up Your Yard at Night
Another backyard tip is to install motion-sensor lights that are pointed outside your fence line. That way, if a coyote does come around, the light will turn on before he gets into your yard. The light will make most coyotes turn back.

Pick up Poop
Your dog’s feces can attract coyotes to your property, so keeping your yard or fields clear of poop can help lower the risk of attracting one. They will also eat fallen fruit, so picking up any windfalls is a good idea. Don’t leave trash outside in bags and make sure all garbage can lids are secure and cannot be tipped over.

Coyote Vests
Coyote vests are made for small dogs and have a Kevlar neck collar armed with 1-inch spikes and spikes down the back, making it hard for coyotes to get a bite. If you have a small dog, these vests may provide good protection in coyote country.

Coyote Protection on Walks
The coyote vest mentioned above is great for your dog to wear on a walk if you’re in an area where you might encounter one. Keeping your dog on leash is also safer, since most coyotes are wary of people and won’t attack your dog if he’s close to you. Bringing something along that makes a loud noise — a whistle, bell, horn, etc. — is another good way to scare off a lingering coyote.

Remember that even if coyotes don’t attack your dog, they carry and transmit many diseases and parasites, including rabies, distemper, parvovirus, hepatitis, mange, fleas, worms, and ticks. So, keeping them out of your neighborhood is something that should be on everyone’s radar. Neighbors should always post coyote sightings. Together, you can keep your dogs (and other pets) safe.

Don’t become indifferent… if you see a coyote in your yard or neighborhood ALWAYS haze them away. Do so completely, and remind your neighbors of the importance of doing the same.

Keep cats indoors. Always is safest, but at least between the dusk and dawn hours (when coyotes tend to be most active).

Yes, coyotes are an important part of the ecosystems they inhabit, But when you start seeing them in your yard, on your street, or generally in your neighborhood — it does make one think about their presence just a little bit more.

01/09/2022

Mmhm 🐶♥️

12/23/2021

Getting that someone special a puppy or a kitten for Christmas?

While we always want homeless pets to find a good, loving home, we want them to stay in that home for the rest of their lives!

Having a pet is a 10-15 year commitment (or more!) It is for the lifetime of that animal, and not just until the newness wears off, or when they start demonstrating certain bad behaviors, or especially when they get too old.

Also, don’t surprise someone with a new pet if they may not be ready or even want that pet. Surprises are great, but it’s best to make sure the person even wants the pet before you give it as a gift! It’s not about you or potentially ruining the surprise. It’s about the life of that animal.

Adopt responsibly. Merry Christmas. 🎄🐾♥️🎅🏽

12/23/2021

Getting that someone special a puppy or a kitten for Christmas?

While we always want homeless pets to find a good, loving home, we want them to stay in that home for the rest of their lives!

Having a pet is a 10-15 year commitment (or more!) It is for the lifetime of that animal, and not just until the newness wears off, or when they start demonstrating certain bad behaviors, or especially when they get too old.

Also, don’t surprise someone with a new pet if they may not be ready or even want that pet. Surprises are great, but it’s best to make sure the person even wants the pet before you give it as a gift! It’s not about you or potentially ruining the surprise. It’s about the life of that animal.

Adopt responsibly. Merry Christmas. 🎄🐾♥️🎅🏽

Photos from C.A.R.E.4Paws's post
12/04/2021

Photos from C.A.R.E.4Paws's post

Courtesy Post, NOT at Cold Noses, Warm Hearts
11/30/2021

Courtesy Post, NOT at Cold Noses, Warm Hearts

This Giving Tuesday, please help us deliver the promise of hope to the dogs who need it most!

I think I speak for everyone in the animal rescue world when I say that these past months have been overwhelming. The need in our community has grown to the point that it feels like we are trying to fight a wildfire with a bucket of water.

In less than a month, we have taken in 7 animals (5 dogs and 2 pigs) whose owners passed away. Two of the dogs have found homes already but one of them - Stella - needed life-saving surgery and ongoing treatment for a malignant tumor on her foot. While many orgs would have turned away from this dog because of the high cost of medical care, we know that this squishy little 8 year old has alot of life and love left. We found her perfect home and she will live out her days loved and cared for but we have committed to seeing her through her surgery and cancer treatments.

Another of those dogs, Buddha, who was living alone for months in his back yard after his owner passed, is happy as a clam here at the sanctuary - but he too has a tumor on one of his toes that must be surgically removed.

Delilah was 1 of 5 puppies that Shadow's Fund took in from a neglectful situation. All of the puppies were adopted into loving homes and Delilah is with an amazing foster to adopt home. She has 2 blown cruciate ligaments which will require back to back surgeries, each costing upwards $6000.

Friends, we don't turn away from the tough cases. In fact, we're kind of the last best hope for all the dogs that no one else can or will help. And that is exactly what we set out to be. We want to be a light in the darkness for the dog that has no reason to hope; the dog that has been failed so many times they have all but stopped trying. We have spent the last l2 years doing that and building a sanctuary that provides a home for these dogs, and we've only done that because you have always been there for us. YOU made it possible to deliver the promise.

So on this Giving Tuesday, we are humbly asking once again for your help. We are looking at well over $20,000 in medical costs alone for some of the dogs we recently said "yes" to. And we still have 60 animals at the sanctuary who need us every day. Please consider a donation to Shadow's Fund this year. Your support will save or change a life. Thank you!

Mobile uploads
11/25/2021

Mobile uploads

Happy Thanksgiving! These are some things to NOT feed your furry friends.

11/25/2021

Keep your pets safe this Thanksgiving by knowing what they can and can’t have at dinner time! 🦃🐾♥️

10/30/2021

If you have a pair of dogs at home, have you ever noticed that when one is distressed, the other also reacts the same or tries to offer them comfort? This could be why!

Photos from SB Dog Foster, Adoption & Community Resource + DAWG THEN  1991-2019's post
10/02/2021

Photos from SB Dog Foster, Adoption & Community Resource + DAWG THEN 1991-2019's post

09/24/2021

Who Agrees??!!

#dvshr #itsahuskything
courtesy: I Love My Husky

09/24/2021

Meet handsome Andrew “Andy”. This boy has had a bit of a rough start. Andy is currently in a short-term foster home and still decompressing and his foster mom is still learning about him and gathering great information for his future owner(s). He seems to be doing better each day. So far, what we know is that he’s a sweet guy who is needs a committed dedicated owner and one that will take a leadership role. Not because Andy is difficult but because he came from an environment where he was likely made to feel like he had to assume that leadership role. No dog ever wants to be the leader of their human(s) or their household.

Andy is very sweet but can be a tad timid. He can flinch if you move to quickly, which indicates he was likely the subject of human aggression at some time in his life. When Andy is feeling comfortable, he will lean into you and relishes in pets and scratches. Andy is a dog that deserves a second chance at a loving home. He deserves to learn that humans can be trusted, take the lead and give him guidance along with love. Because of his past, we will look for an owner that will be patient and work with Andy on some of insecurities. His rescue feels he will blossom into an even better canine companion than he already is.

Andy seems to be good with other dogs with a proper introduction but he’d likely flourish being the only dog in the home. Andy was in a home with other dogs and the dogs didn't seem to be a cohesive match. The dogs got into a scuffle (as dogs can) and when the previous owner attempted to intervene, she got bit (as we know, often happens. Sadly, the dog gets the demerit). This wasn’t an aggressive bite but a situational bite. His rescue organization can apprise any adopter with more details.

Again, his foster mom learns more about Andy daily. It would be great to get him into a longer-term foster or committed forever home.

Everyone is rooting for and wants Andy to have the opportunity to put his best paw forward and have many happy tails ahead! If you’re interested, please contact Ciara at Cold Noses Warm Hearts. 805-964-2446. There will be an application process and of course a meet and greet if you may be a good for fit Andy.

09/22/2021

Update: As of 9-29-21, I'm in a foster to adopt home. Big thank you to everyone! 🤞

Hi everyone! My name is Rusty, and I am 1-2 years young. I was rescued from a shelter. I’m currently staying in a foster home, and I have to say, my foster mom loves me, but she already has dogs of her own. That means I’m looking for a loving home of my own!

I don't want to brag but my foster mom says I’m pretty much “perfect” in her household. Not only do I have an endearing personality but I'm stinkin' cute. I can be a little reserved around new people but once I get to know you, I’ll be your best buddy. I like to hang out and follow my person and I love to play with my toys.

As you can see, I love my snuggly bed. I’m also not “barky”.

If you’re interested in more information about me or think you and I may be a good match, please call my foster mom Terra @ 805-964-2446.

I’m adoptable through Cold Noses Warm Hearts. They are super nice and will have you complete an adoption application and a meet and greet if they feel we’d be compatible.

Thanks,

Rusty

Address

5758 Hollister Ave
Goleta, CA
93117

Opening Hours

Tuesday 7am - 5:30pm
Wednesday 7am - 5:30pm
Thursday 7am - 5:30pm
Friday 7am - 5:30pm
Saturday 7am - 5:30pm

Telephone

+18059642446

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Courtesy Post Only, NOT Cold Noses, Warm Hearts pups
Courtesy Post, NOT a Cold Noses, Warm Hearts dog
Courtesy Post, NOT at Cold Noses, Warm Hearts