The Cat and Bird Clinic

The Cat and Bird Clinic Veterinary hospital catering to cats and birds

Operating as usual

09/02/2021

SAFETY ALERT
Animal products containing ivermectin SHOULD NOT be used in people. These products can cause serious health effects, including death.
Ivermectin has not been shown to be a safe or effective way to prevent or treat COVID-19. It is a livestock dewormer. Clinical effects of ivermectin overdose include gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Overdoses are associated with hypotension and neurologic effects such as decreased consciousness, confusion, hallucinations, seizures, coma, and death. Ivermectin may potentiate the effects of other drugs that cause central nervous system depression such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates.

If you are worried about COVID-19, please talk to your doctor.

Find more information from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

SARS-CoV-2 and domestic animals, including petsThis information is provided by the American Veterinary Medical Associati...
04/03/2020
COVID-19

SARS-CoV-2 and domestic animals, including pets

This information is provided by the American Veterinary Medical Association

For additional information please visit their website: https://www.avma.org/resources-tools/animal-health-and-welfare/covid-19



Dogs in Hong Kong

On Thursday, February 27, Hong Kong’s Agriculture, Fisheries, and Conservation Department (AFCD) reported that samples obtained on February 26 from the nasal and oral cavities of a quarantined 17-year-old Pomeranian whose owner had been diagnosed with COVID-19 had tested “weak positive” for SARS-CoV-2, using a real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT PCR) test. Results from a re**al swab and f***l sample were negative. The RT PCR test is sensitive, specific, and does not cross-react with other coronaviruses of dogs or cats. A “weak positive” result suggests a small quantity of SARS-CoV-2 RNA was present in the samples, but does not distinguish between RNA detected from intact virus and that detected from fragments of viral RNA. PCR testing was repeated on samples collected February 28, March 2, 5, and 9 with continued “weak positive” results on nasal cavity samples. In addition, gene sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 from the Pomeranian and its close human contacts was completed on March 12 and the viral sequences were very similar. Results of a virus neutralizing antibody test on a sample collected March 3 were also available on March 12 and were negative, but further serological testing on that blood sample performed by the WHO reference laboratory yielded positive results, suggesting that the Pomeranian had developed an immune response to the virus. Virus isolation was performed with negative results. Results of RT PCR conducted on nasal samples on March 12 and 13 were also negative, and the dog was released to its owner on the following day. Experts from the School of Public Health of the University of Hong Kong and the College of Veterinary Medicine and Life Sciences of the City University of Hong Kong believe the consistency and persistence of the results suggest the virus may have spread from the infected people to the Pomeranian in this particular case. Testing was conducted by the laboratories of the AFCD and the School of Public Health of the University of Hong Kong. The latter is an accredited reference laboratory for the WHO for the testing of SARS-COV-2. The Pomeranian was one of two pet dogs under quarantine. The second pet dog had consistently negative results of tests for the virus. Neither dog showed any signs of respiratory disease during quarantine. Unfortunately, the Pomeranian that tested positive reportedly passed away three days after release. The dog was 17 years old and had ongoing health issues that were likely responsible for the death of this dog, rather than COVID-19.

On March 19, the AFCD reported that a two-year-old German Shepherd Dog, whose owner had tested positive for COVID-19, had also tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, using RT PCR. Another mixed-breed dog from the same residence tested negative. Neither dog has shown signs of respiratory disease. Both dogs are in quarantine and are continuing to be monitored and tested.

As of March 25, the AFCD had conducted tests on 17 dogs and 8 cats from households with confirmed COVID-19 human cases, or people in close contact with confirmed patients, and only 2 dogs had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2.





Cat in Belgium

During the third week of March, the Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) in Belgium reported it was informed on March 18 by the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Liege that viral RNA of SARS-CoV-2 was detected by PCR (RT-PCR and high throughput sequencing PCR; specifics not provided) in the f***s and vomit of a cat with digestive and respiratory clinical signs. The cat was owned by a person infected with SARS-CoV-2, but according to the Scientific Committee of the FASFC it is not known whether the sequences of virus in the cat and the owner were similar.

Information is not available regarding what other conditions potentially leading to respiratory or gastrointestinal signs were considered or evaluated for this cat. The cat reportedly became ill one week after its owner had returned from Italy, but the date samples were collected in relationship to when the cat’s clinical signs first appeared and how those samples were collected (e.g., directly from the cat, off the floor) are also not known. Because other etiologic causes for the cat’s illness appear to have not been excluded and little is known about the samples in which viral material was detected, a clear link between the presence of viral material and clinical signs consistent with coronavirus infection cannot be established. The condition of the cat reportedly improved 9 days after onset of clinical signs.

Right now, we have limited information about SARS-CoV-2 and dogs and cats. However, taken collectively, as of right now it appears that dogs and cats are not infected easily with SARS-CoV-2, we have little to no evidence that they become sick, and there is no evidence that pets can transmit SARS-CoV-2 to people or other pets.



Cat in Hong Kong
On March 31, the AFCD reported that a pet cat that lived in a residence with an individual confirmed to be ill with COVID-19 had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 via oral cavity, nasal, and re**al samples. The cat is in quarantine and has exhibited no clinical signs of disease.



Pets in homes with owners with COVID-19

Whereas there is currently little to no evidence that pets or other domestic animals become sick with COVID-19, and no evidence that they can spread SARS-CoV-2, out of an abundance of caution, it is recommended that those ill with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. If you are ill with COVID-19 have another member of your household take care of walking, feeding, and playing with your pet. If you have a service animal or you must care for your pet, then wear a facemask; don’t share food, kiss, or hug them; and wash your hands before and after any contact with your pet or service animal. You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels, or bedding with other people or pets in your home. Additional guidance on managing pets in homes where people are sick with COVID-19 is available from the CDC.



Testing companion animals

With the exception of the single report of illness in the cat in Belgium , there have not been additional reports of pets or other domestic animals becoming ill, and there is no evidence that domestic animals, including pets, can spread SARS-CoV-2. These findings are consistent with information obtained during a recent rapid review of the literature exploring evidence of infection of dogs and cats with human-associated coronavirus SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 and fomite potential for dogs and cats. Because the situation is ever-evolving, public and animal health officials may decide to test certain animals out of an abundance of caution. In the United States, the decision to test will made collaboratively between local, state, and federal animal and public health officials. Answers to questions frequently asked by state animal and public health officials and the public are available from USDA



After the decision is made to test, state animal health officials will designate a state-appointed veterinarian, USDA-accredited veterinarian, or foreign animal disease diagnostician to collect the sample using appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and sample collection methods.

Again, current expert understanding is that COVID-19 is primarily transmitted person-to-person. This supports a recommendation against testing of pets for SARS-CoV-2, except by official order. If dogs or cats present with respiratory or gastrointestinal signs, veterinarians should test for more common pathogens and conditions.



Keeping pets safe

For responsible pet owners, preparing in advance is key. Make sure you have an emergency kit prepared, with at least two weeks’ worth of your pet’s food and any needed medications. Usually we think about emergency kits like this in terms of what might be needed for an evacuation, but it’s also good to have one prepared in the case of quarantine or self-isolation when you cannot leave your home.



While we are recommending these as good practices, it is important to remember that there is currently no evidence that pets can spread COVID-19 to other domestic animals, including people. Accordingly, there is no reason to remove pets from homes where COVID-19 has been identified in members of the household, unless there is risk that the pet itself is not able to be cared for appropriately. In this emergency, pets and people each need the support of the other and veterinarians are there to support the good health of both.

AVMA is committed to helping the veterinary community through the COVID-19 pandemic. Get actionable information on PPE, implementing social distancing in practice, accessing government economic programs, and more.

Thank you again to my amazing husband Craig for another beautiful drawing this year for I’Madonnari!!!
05/29/2018

Thank you again to my amazing husband Craig for another beautiful drawing this year for I’Madonnari!!!

04/25/2018
ucanr.edu

UC Davis researchers on a hunt for backyard chicken eggs around the Thomas Fire burn scar

Veterinarians at UC Davis have put out a call for eggs from California’s backyard chicken owners, particularly those living near the Thomas Fire and other recent blazes.

They want to test the eggs for free in an effort to understand how they might be affected by wildfires, lead and other environmental factors.

It’s called the Backyard Chicken Egg Study. And, they need help from backyard chicken enthusiasts, said Maurice Pitesky, a faculty member at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine-UC Cooperative Extension.

“We’re trying to understand the connection between the environment and our backyard chickens,” said Pitesky, who teamed up with colleague Birgit Puschner to test the eggs.

Chickens spend a lot of time picking their food off the ground, he said. Because of that, they end up particularly close to their environment.

Help rebuilding post-fire: Ventura forgives some Thomas Fire rebuilding costs

Thomas took their home: The Thomas Fire took their Ventura County home; a stranger saved their horses

Bears found burned: Badly burned in the Thomas Fire, 2 bears make comeback, thanks to fish skin, acupuncture

With recent fires in Sonoma, Napa and Ventura counties last year, the researchers wanted to look at what kind of impact that might have on eggs.

But they also want to look at eggs elsewhere in the state.

Puschner, a veterinary toxicologist, will test for different types of contaminants depending on the area.

In wildfire areas, eggs will be tested for chemicals, building materials and heavy metals that may have been carried in the smoke and ash. In some regions, they will look for lead and other chemicals.

“We’ve had over 52 different submissions from eight to nine counties,” Pitesky said. “We’re hoping to get over 100.”

So far, 15 have come from Ventura County.

Ventura chicken owner Eric Werbalowsky lives near the Thomas Fire burn scar, but his property was OK, he said.

Werbalowsky thinks his chicken eggs, and others in similar areas, would have no ill effects from the fires.

“There may be issues for chickens roaming in burned structures,” he said. “Otherwise, I’m skeptical.”

Pitesky said it’s too soon to say what will be discovered.

“I think the short answer is: We don’t know,” he said. “That’s why we’re doing this study.”

Researchers will consider various factors and use mapping to look at what role distance, wind and housing materials could play, he said.

Researchers plan to share individual egg results with each poultry owner. At the end of the study, a summary of all the results will be made available to the public.

They hope to get two to six eggs from each flock. Each submission should include a form about where the eggs came from and the chickens. The form is available at http://ucanr.edu/sites/poultry/files/281430.pdf.

Packing instructions also are available online. The main focus: that the eggs arrive intact.

Researchers suggest wrapping each egg individually before placing it in an egg carton. Bubble wrap or crumpled paper then can be packed around the egg carton in a box.

To get help with shipping costs, poultry owners can contact Anny Huang at [email protected] to get a mailing label. She will email the label to the poultry owner to print and stick on the package.

For more information, visit http://ucanr.edu/eggtest.

It’s that time of year again. Please share this information with all of your friends. Thank you! Dr. Sellers
03/31/2018

It’s that time of year again. Please share this information with all of your friends. Thank you! Dr. Sellers

12/18/2017

We will be open tomorrow 12/18 during our normal business hours of 8-5:30. We will not be taking patients that need to stay over night as they are still forecasting wind events that would place the clinic into a mandatory evacuation area. If you have a reservation to board your animal with us over the holidays we will be contacting you to change your reservation. In light of the expected wind event on Wednesday we do not feel comfortable returning the boarded animals to the clinic yet. They are still safe at Dr. Sellers home in Goleta.
Thank you for your understanding,
Dr. Sellers

12/16/2017

The clinic is currently evacuated as of this morning. If you have your pets boarded with us we have tried to contact you, but they have been safely moved to Dr. Sellers house out of the evacuation areas in Goleta. They have all of their medications and special diets. If you are a client trying to get in touch with us for any other reason we are closed until further notice, however our machine does accept messages and we will return them as soon as we are able. Our message states to contact AVS or CARE in case of an emergency however they are now under evacuation warning as well.

The nearest 24 hour emergency clinics are:
1. Central Coast Pet Emergency located at 1558 W Branch St, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420
2. Veterinary Medical and Surgery Group located at 2199 Sperry Ave, Ventura, CA 93003

We apologize for any inconvenice. Best wishes to you and your animals during this critical time.
Dr. Sellers & Staff

Such cuties! So much fun to help these little orphaned squirrels
08/25/2017

Such cuties! So much fun to help these little orphaned squirrels

x-ray before and resting after removal....
07/21/2017

x-ray before and resting after removal....

This pigeon was brought to me by County Animal Control today because it was pierced into the Goleta pier by a crossbow. ...
07/21/2017

This pigeon was brought to me by County Animal Control today because it was pierced into the Goleta pier by a crossbow. Amazingly, no bones or organs were damaged. I was able to remove the bow and this poor guy is at the clinic being treated. Please help us find the person who did this deplorable act. If anyone saw someone using a crossbow by the Goleta pier yesterday or this morning please call Animal Control or the clinic. Thank you, Dr. Sellers

My niece just fostered this 6 year old boy from a shelter in Los Angeles while he was recovering from a respiratory infe...
12/10/2016

My niece just fostered this 6 year old boy from a shelter in Los Angeles while he was recovering from a respiratory infection. He was going to be euthanized. He is well now and in need of a loving home.

Welcome to our 2 latest employees!! Erin and Pippi!! (No, Erin's bandage is not related 😊)....
12/09/2016

Welcome to our 2 latest employees!! Erin and Pippi!! (No, Erin's bandage is not related 😊)....

Timeline Photos
12/09/2016

Timeline Photos

We will be closed Wednesday Nov 23 through Friday Nov 25 so that our employees can enjoy the holiday with their families...
11/17/2016

We will be closed Wednesday Nov 23 through Friday Nov 25 so that our employees can enjoy the holiday with their families. We will be open 8-12 on Saturday Nov 26th. We wish everyone a happy, healthy and safe Thanksgiving Holiday!!
Dr. Christine Sellers

Address

101 W Mission St
Santa Barbara, CA
93101

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5:30pm
Tuesday 8am - 5:30pm
Wednesday 8am - 5:30pm
Thursday 8am - 5:30pm
Friday 8am - 5:30pm
Saturday 8am - 12pm

Telephone

(805) 569-2287

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Comments

I thought I would share how much Sunny is enjoying her life these days. Sun on her face and wind at her back. A rare photo of her with eye closed. She’ll see you soon ❤️
Please, Santa Barbara people, share! Somebody saw a lady taking Boyo in a grey metallic car. Our hearts are broken. We want him back, and won't stop until he is home where he belongs. Please, return him, no questions asked. He is a big gray tabby, very friendly, usually rolls over to say hi. He is around 3 years old and microchipped. We are heartbroken. If you have seen him, please respond by email to this ad. He was last seen on June 19th around Salinas Place and Oak (East Side). There are two little girls waiting to see their friend again.
It's always reassuring to know that I have a expert vet for Pan (and for Leeloo before him)... the only vet to have whole sections of cat food in the Pet House in Goleta labelled "Foods approved by Dr. Sellers/Cat and Bird Clinic are printed on GREEN labels." I'm going to gradually ween Pan off of foods which have dropped off the recommendation list a few years ago. But some of these new more expensive foods make me wonder how much of a gimmick their advertising may be... "guar gum free"? "chicken meal-free"?
The first visit to Dr. Sellers of my new son Pan, named for Pantalaimon, Lyra's dearest companion in The Golden Compass, Philip Pullman's Dark Materials Trilogy, also the name Pan is probably a cognate with the Greek word ὀπάων "companion", and the center three letters of "companion".
"This going to the vet for the first time isn't so bad," Pan thought, as Dr. Sellers whispered sweet nothings into his ear.
Our family has brought our cats for the past 24 years without any complaints. Dr. Sellers has always helped me and gave me good guidance regarding my cats, especially as they have gotten older and developed diseases associated with old age. Dr. Sellers is caring and a very knowledgeable person who tries to be accommodating to the best of her ability. My cat's care has been changed to Dr. Jill Pruett a few years ago I believe. I believe what happened is Dr. Sellers was out of the office and I needed to see a vet and Dr. Pruett was available and so I saw her for an annual regarding my cats. From that point onward, all my cats files got changed to Dr. Pruett. I didn't think anything of it because I knew that the Cat & Bird Clinic was a good place to bring my cats. The one thing that has always annoyed me about Dr. Pruett is that she only treats cats by appointment only. She won't take any drop offs. If you cat is sick, it can be days before you see Dr. Pruett. September 17, 2018, I brought all three of my cats to see Dr. Pruett for their annual check-up. Dr. Pruett's files indicated that it had been 2 years since she saw them for their annual. I am a full time caregiver for my mother, but I usually don't miss appointments and I recall not receiving any notifications in the mail for annual check-ups as I used to. I brought this matter up with the receptionist and she said that Cat & Bird Clinic was changing their system. All my cats were examined by Dr. Pruett and all three cats had a blood test and their urine tested. All three cats came back with a high ph level they were healthy according to the test. Dr. Pruett recommended that the cats go on an SO diet for 6 weeks and get rechecked. I started feeding the new SO diet the beginning of October 2018. Around October 22, 2018 I noticed that one of my cats was drinking an awful lot of water. This concerned me because I was afraid he might be diabetic. I telephoned the office and expressed my concern with one of my cats drinking an excessive amount of water. I mention that the other two cats were okay. I asked if this information can be passed on to Dr. Pruett and tell me what to do. On October 24, 2018 I received a phone call from one of the staff members who relayed a message from Dr. Pruett. Dr. Pruett said that it is not uncommon for a cat to drink more on the SO diet. As a matter of fact this is a good thing because the body is flushing out the crystals. I took her word for it and continued to observe him. November 12th, 2018 I noticed that my cat didn't feel like eating and I also noticed that he seemed to be straining to urinate. I called the Cat & Bird Clinic and explained what was happening and that I would like to bring him in that day. Cat & Bird Clinic said they had no availability and they could not take any drop offs that day, but they could take him the next day. I asked the receptionist if she could ask Dr. Sellers if she could see him when she arrived at 10:00AM. I called the clinic again at 11:00AM to see if Dr. Sellers could see him. She said that she could not. Dr. Sellers did however ask about his symptoms. I conveyed the information by phone to Dr. Sellers and she said to take him to the emergency. I took my cat to AVS and a doctor looked him over and gave me medicine for pain and medication to dialate his urethra and sent me home with my cat. I gave him the medication as directed by the doctor. I still noticed no change and I didn't feel good about what I was seeing and I took my cat back to AVS the following morning at 4:00AM. The doctor on call immediately did a blood test and urinalysis. I went home and received a call around 7:00AM. The doctor said that his ph level was fine, but his blood glucose level was 400. My cat crashed and he almost died. He had Diabetic Ketoacidosis. He had pancreatitis, a fatty liver, he was expelling ketones in his urine. He was anemic and had to receive two transfusions to save his life. He has been through a lot and we almost lost him. One thing that I wish is that Dr. Pruett would have said is that I believe it is the SO diet that is making him drink water, but let's re-check him with a blood test and urinalysis. Had this been done, my cat would not have had to go through this suffering and we could have possibly avoided an $18K bill. In addition, I noticed when you want to make an appointment at the Cat & Bird Clinic, some staff members tell the customers to make an appointment with another vet. That has happened to me a few times - NOT GOOD! With all that has happened, I felt that it was best to change veterinarians who were more enthusiastic, more organized and cared about their patience and owners who have been loyal for 24 years. It is a shame because I really like Dr. Sellers.
Our family has brought our cats for the past 24 years without any complaints. Dr. Sellers has always helped me and gave me good guidance regarding my cats, especially as they have gotten older and developed diseases associated with old age. Dr. Sellers is caring and a very knowledgeable person who tries to be accommodating to the best of her ability. My cat's care has been changed to Dr. Jill Pruett a few years ago I believe. I believe what happened is Dr. Sellers was out of the office and I needed to see a vet and Dr. Pruett was available and so I saw her for an annual regarding my cats. From that point onward, all my cats files got changed to Dr. Pruett. I didn't think anything of it because I knew that the Cat & Bird Clinic was a good place to bring my cats. The one thing that has always annoyed me about Dr. Pruett is that she only treats cats by appointment only. She won't take any drop offs. If you cat is sick, it can be days before you see Dr. Pruett. September 17, 2018, I brought all three of my cats to see Dr. Pruett for their annual check-up. Dr. Pruett's files indicated that it had been 2 years since she saw them for their annual. I am a full time caregiver for my mother, but I usually don't miss appointments and I recall not receiving any notifications in the mail for annual check-ups as I used to. I brought this matter up with the receptionist and she said that Cat & Bird Clinic was changing their system. All my cats were examined by Dr. Pruett and all three cats had a blood test and their urine tested. All three cats came back with a high ph level they were healthy according to the test. Dr. Pruett recommended that the cats go on an SO diet for 6 weeks and get rechecked. I started feeding the new SO diet the beginning of October 2018. Around October 22, 2018 I noticed that one of my cats was drinking an awful lot of water. This concerned me because I was afraid he might be diabetic. I telephoned the office and expressed my concern with one of my cats drinking an excessive amount of water. I mention that the other two cats were okay. I asked if this information can be passed on to Dr. Pruett and tell me what to do. On October 24, 2018 I received a phone call from one of the staff members who relayed a message from Dr. Pruett. Dr. Pruett said that it is not uncommon for a cat to drink more on the SO diet. As a matter of fact this is a good thing because the body is flushing out the crystals. I took her word for it and continued to observe him. November 12th, 2018 I noticed that my cat didn't feel like eating and I also noticed that he seemed to be straining to urinate. I called the Cat & Bird Clinic and explained what was happening and that I would like to bring him in that day. Cat & Bird Clinic said they had no availability and they could not take any drop offs that day, but they could take him the next day. I asked the receptionist if she could ask Dr. Sellers if she could see him when she arrived at 10:00AM. I called the clinic again at 11:00AM to see if Dr. Sellers could see him. She said that she could not. Dr. Sellers did however ask about his symptoms. I conveyed the information by phone to Dr. Sellers and she said to take him to the emergency. I took my cat to AVS and a doctor looked him over and gave me medicine for pain and medication to dialate his urethra and sent me home with my cat. I gave him the medication as directed by the doctor. I still noticed no change and I didn't feel good about what I was seeing and I took my cat back to AVS the following morning at 4:00AM. The doctor on call immediately did a blood test and urinalysis. I went home and received a call around 7:00AM. The doctor said that his ph level was fine, but his blood glucose level was 400. My cat crashed and he almost died. He had Diabetic Ketoacidosis. He had pancreatitis, a fatty liver, he was expelling ketones in his urine. He was anemic and had to receive two transfusions to save his life. He has been through a lot and we almost lost him. One thing that I wish is that Dr. Pruett would have said is that I believe it is the SO diet that is making him drink water, but let's re-check him with a blood test and urinalysis. Had this been done, my cat would not have had to go through this suffering and we could have possibly avoided an $18K bill. In addition, I noticed when you want to make an appointment at the Cat & Bird Clinic, some staff members tell the customers to make an appointment with another vet. That has happened to me a few times - NOT GOOD! With all that has happened, I felt that it was best to change veterinarians who were more enthusiastic, more organized and cared about their patience and owners who have been loyal for 24 years. It is a shame because I really like Dr. Sellers. I found a new veterinarian and I am very happy with the change. The vets are very thorough and they go out of their way to help you. The front office is helpful too. If a vet is unavailable, then they will find another vet to help you. Lesson learned! Listen to your gut. If a situation doesn't feel right - it's because something isn't right. If you are not happy with the service then change vets immediately. You must be your own advocate not only for yourself, but your fur babies too!