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Rhinebeck Equine

Rhinebeck Equine Rhinebeck Equine LLP is dedicated to improving the health and welfare of the horse while exceeding our clients’ expectations for compassionate care.

We aim to further the knowledge of our clients, and be leaders in the equine veterinary community. Rhinebeck Equine is an independently owned, exclusively equine, practice located in Dutchess County in the Hudson River Valley about 120 miles north of NYC. The practice was founded in the 1940s by Dr. Kenneth Gumaer and began its equine focus in 1967 when Dr. Paul Mountan joined Dr. Ronnie Miller. R

We aim to further the knowledge of our clients, and be leaders in the equine veterinary community. Rhinebeck Equine is an independently owned, exclusively equine, practice located in Dutchess County in the Hudson River Valley about 120 miles north of NYC. The practice was founded in the 1940s by Dr. Kenneth Gumaer and began its equine focus in 1967 when Dr. Paul Mountan joined Dr. Ronnie Miller. R

Operating as usual

Happy #FoalFriday! 🐴 This Gypsy Vanner colt from Stone Bridge Stables had marked swelling in the inguinal region at 12 h...
06/10/2022

Happy #FoalFriday!

🐴 This Gypsy Vanner colt from Stone Bridge Stables had marked swelling in the inguinal region at 12 hours of age. He was evaluated by Dr. Barbara Schmidt of SmartEQ who suspected an inguinal hernia. She was not able to reduce (replace the contents of the hernia) the hernia and referred the colt to us.

🩺The colt was evaluated by Dr. Courtney Pope with our internal medicine team. The colt was bright and healthy systemically but was showing mild signs of discomfort. Dr. Pope confirmed small intestine was entrapped within the scrotum using ultrasound. Even with sedation, reducing the intestine back into the abdomen was not possible. Emergency surgery was recommended to correct the herniation prior to the intestine becoming more compromised.

👨‍🔬Dr. Gustavo Abuja, one of our surgeons, performed the surgery. About 1.5 feet of the small intestine were trapped within the scrotum, through the left inguinal ring. Fortunately, the intestine was healthy and motile. The intestine was replaced in the abdomen and the inguinal ring was closed, requiring a unilateral castration.

🎉The colt recovered very well from surgery and went home 4 days later.

📣Congenital inguinal hernias are typically evident at birth or within the first few days of life in male horses. Standardbreds and draft breeds may be predisposed. It is not clear if the condition is heritable. The abnormally large inguinal ring allows small interesting to slip through the ring and into the scrotum. Often the intestine does not become entrapped and the condition resolves over time as the rings close. However, if the intestine becomes entrapped it can lead to severe colic and compromised intestine that may need to be resected.

Palpation of the testicles should be a part of all routine new foal exams. Rapid referral of non-reducible, complicated hernias is key to a positive outcome!

What an amazing evening! Last night, we celebrated the dedication and hard work of our staff and bid farewell to our 202...
06/09/2022

What an amazing evening! Last night, we celebrated the dedication and hard work of our staff and bid farewell to our 2022 Intern doctors at the Black Snake Brewing Company. Every member of our team, and their families that support them, is integral to providing a high level care to our patients and clients and this is never more evident than in the busy spring season. Thank you to the Dads After Dark for the wonderful music, The Black Raven Project for the delicious food, and Boehringer Ingelheim Equine Health for your support!

06/08/2022

Collaboration is key 🤝🔑

...And did you know it's one of the reasons that Millbrook Equine @Equine Clinic at OakenCroft & Rhinebeck Equine founded #CavalcadeEducation? It's true!

Here, Dr. Laura Javsicas of #RhinebeckEquine & Dr. Carlin Jones of #OakenCroftEquine are working together on a case for Dana, who techs with Dr. Jones. They're joined here by Dr. Kylie White & Janine Baker, LVT

This is just one of many ways that Cavalcade's 3 founding practices join forces to improve continuity of care and offer the most for their patients. You can also find them:
📞 Sharing on-call veterinarians
👥 Referring patients and consulting on cases
🔬Sharing equipment
👐 Working together to make integrative medicine available

This week we are saying goodbye to our 2021-2022 Intern doctors. It is amazing to witness their progression over the pas...
06/07/2022

This week we are saying goodbye to our 2021-2022 Intern doctors. It is amazing to witness their progression over the past year. We are grateful for their dedication and extremely hard work. Please join us in wishing them well in their future endeavors. We know they will continue to make us proud!

- Dr. Benjamin Flakoll will be starting a Podiatry Fellowship at Rood & Riddle Equine Podiatry.

- Dr. Jessica Frank will be staying in Rhinebeck and continuing to assist us.

- Dr. Kayla Kownurko will be starting a rotating Large Animal Internship at University of Georgia College of Veterinary Medicine

- Dr. Gabriella Piquini will be starting an Equine Surgery Residency atColorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospitall

- Dr. Kylie White will be returning home to Colorado prior to starting an ambulatory position.

06/06/2022

🌞💦 Does anyone else have a horse who likes to play in the water? Let's start the week out with some laughs! Show us your horses having some fun in the water!
#teamrhinebeckequine #happyhorses #equinehospital #summervibes #splash

#FoalFriday Our entire team at Rhinebeck Equine is dedicated to the highest level of care for our equine patients. Their...
06/03/2022

#FoalFriday Our entire team at Rhinebeck Equine is dedicated to the highest level of care for our equine patients. Their care and compassion create a calming atmosphere that helps the horses thrive. A photo is worth 1,000 words, and these photos certainly reflect how much this little foal loves attention and trusts Ashley! More scratches, please!
#TeamRhinebeckEquine #Foals #excellence #Horsehospital #equinevet #babykisses #scratchesaregood

06/02/2022

#Successstory Working with Katrin at KD Dressage and seeing Top Brass coming along so well in his rehabilitation is gratifying for our team! We are so pleased for them both.

#Repost @katrinderreumaux_dressage with @get.repost
・・・
Top Brass is reunited with his friends.
Brass has been in rehab for a suspected serious pasture injury that left him unable to lower his neck to graze and drink.
We followed our standard protocol:
Observe and involve our trusted vets.
Medical diagnostics
@rhinebeck_equine ✔️
Stall rest and controlled turnout:
Lifestyle changes for healing
Elevated hay and water in sand paddock ✔️
Graduated to night turnout in medical paddock ✔️
Follow up with veterinary team✔️
Regular PEMF therapy with @sportinnovationsequine 3-1 blanket ✔️
A balanced diet and ulcer prevention with Theragaurd from @biostarus ✔️

Reunion with his friends 🎉🦄🎉🙌✔️

Next steps
a month off full turnout -
Back to light work-
Time will tell… but it’s been a huge success so far!!

#equinerehabilitation #veterinarians #equine #equinelifestyle #pemftherapy #tlc #details #observation #equinehealth #horsehealing #sucess #outdoorliving #wholefoodsforhorses #teambiostar

06/01/2022

❗️It looks like it'll be another summer of consistent waves of heat, humidity, and rain near #Cavalcade's founding practices here in NY. With that comes an increased risk of Potomac Horse Fever (PHF).

🆘PHF causes high fever, diarrhea, laminitis (founder), colic, abortion, and can be fatal.

💉Vaccination, while not fully protective against infection, does decrease the severity of the disease and is highly recommended.

📆 Be sure to get in touch with your veterinarian today to determine if your horse should be vaccinated for PHF. It is typically recommended that horses receive a vaccine in May/June and a booster towards the fall.

☑️ #wellnesswednesday Last call for Spring Wellness Days!  Our Wellness Packages are designed to give horse owners the o...
06/01/2022

☑️ #wellnesswednesday
Last call for Spring Wellness Days! Our Wellness Packages are designed to give horse owners the opportunity to schedule annual wellness exams, baseline labs, and other services for their horses and have them performed in a single visit. The deeply discounted package pricing and a reduced call charge will help you give the best care to your equine partner. These calls are for routine preventative care including an annual physical exam, vaccines, Wellness Packages, Coggins, microchipping, and routine dental work. An annual physical exam allows your veterinarian to ensure your horse is healthy prior to receiving vaccines, catch health issues early before they become a threat, and advise on any nutrition or other concerns. https://rhinebeckequine.com/spring-wellness-days-2022
#teamrhinebeckequine #preventativehealthcare #bestmanagementpractices #equinevet
#ambulatoryvet #horselife

🤩We absolutely love our patients, and it shows! We are pleased to have Zephyr in our care. @RosemaryFarm #teamrhinebecke...
05/31/2022

🤩We absolutely love our patients, and it shows! We are pleased to have Zephyr in our care. @RosemaryFarm
#teamrhinebeckequine #surgeon #dvm #equinehospital #care #committment

Requested a new photo of our colt Zephyr as he continues to improve at Rhinebeck Equine and received this. I think surgeon Dr. Nutt likes him. 🙂

We are forever grateful for the ultimate sacrifice of those who died for our country. May their courage and dedication n...
05/30/2022

We are forever grateful for the ultimate sacrifice of those who died for our country. May their courage and dedication never be forgotten. #memorialday

We are thrilled this unique pair from All The King's Horses got to go home today!
05/28/2022

We are thrilled this unique pair from All The King's Horses got to go home today!

Look who is coming home 🏡 #home #foalfriday #foal #colt #mustang #wildhorses @rhinebeck_equine @millingtoneq

05/27/2022
05/27/2022
Foal Friday

What is better than #foalfriday? An adorable Foal Friday medley featuring just a few of the stars of a very busy spring foaling season for Team Rhinebeck Equine. 💗🦄⭐
#TeamRhinebeckEquine #teamrepro #foalingseason #ambulatoryvet #equinehospital #babyfaces #youcandoit #legsformiles

🗣 Gastric Ulcer Public Service Announcement There have been many posts circulating about a new saliva test for gastric u...
05/27/2022

🗣 Gastric Ulcer Public Service Announcement
There have been many posts circulating about a new saliva test for gastric ulcers. While this seems very exciting and maybe a useful adjunctive test someday, there are a few important caveats to be aware of. First, the study mentioned is a pilot study with minimal numbers of horses, and it will likely be a long time until it is available. Second, and more importantly, nothing replaces gastroscopy to determine the location and severity of gastric ulcers. The location and severity determine the treatment regimen, which can vary substantially. Here are some photos showing a variety of lesions our internal medicine specialists have seen in just the last few weeks.
#teamrhinebeckequine #bestpractices #equinehospital #equinevet #Ulcers #science #healthyhorses

05/26/2022

Horses give birth remarkably quickly, ideally within twenty minutes from the time active labor begins. There is likely an evolutionary reason for this; as prey animals, mares benefit from being able to progress quickly through labor and the associated recumbency, and foals who stand quickly have a shot at escaping predators, too. Of course, this isn't an issue with our domesticated horses but there is a postpartum threat to mares that can prove deadly.

Once the mare has delivered the foal, the placenta must also be expelled. The equine uterus is divided into two horns. The foal develops in one and the other remains empty, meaning the entire placenta must encompass not only the foal but also the non-pregnant portion of the uterus. Sometimes an intact placenta will pass shortly after the foal, but more commonly a portion of the placenta will hang out of the mare while the rest remains in the uterus. It is common to tie up the pendulous portion to provide gentle traction on the uterine portion; this usually results in delivery of the entire placenta.

The danger arises when a portion of the placenta is retained for more than three hours after the foal is born. This can result in bacteria and associated toxins entering the mare's bloodstream, a condition called endotoxemia. Endotoxemia can rapidly lead to laminitis. Even a tiny portion of placenta left in the mare can prove life-threatening. Mares and foals should be examined by a veterinarian within 12-24 after birth but if you are concerned about a retained placenta, please call your veterinarian immediately! There are many interventions that can help improve outcomes and save your mare's life.

📸: Dr. Miranda Gosselin of Millbrook Equine checking out the placenta from a new arrival this spring

#WellnessWednesday  Dr. Javiscas recently co-authored an article entitled “Field Safety Experience With an Autologous Ca...
05/25/2022

#WellnessWednesday Dr. Javiscas recently co-authored an article entitled “Field Safety Experience With an Autologous Cancer Vaccine in 41 Horses: A Retrospective Study”.
Most people know or have seen a horse with cancer. This type of research is so important. We are pleased to share the final open version with our clients. It is an interesting scientific study worth a read.
⭐️Highlights:
👉Immunotherapy is a potential post-operative treatment option for horses with solid tumors
👉Autologous cancer vaccines are a form of individualized, active immunotherapy
👉Autologous cancer vaccines use the patient's tumor as the antigen source
👉Adverse events in horses treated with an autologous cancer vaccine were infrequent
👉Observed adverse events were mild, with no serious adverse events reported in these horses

Click this link and you will be taken to the article on ScienceDirect. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jevs.2022.103948

#teamrhinebeckequine #science #veterinarians #dvm #Equinehospital #cancerresearchforhorses #equinevet #wellness #research
#ScienceDirect

Photos from American Association of Equine Practitioners's post
05/24/2022

Photos from American Association of Equine Practitioners's post

#mondaymood “The air and the earth interpenetrated in the warm gusts of spring; the soil was full of sunlight, and the s...
05/23/2022

#mondaymood “The air and the earth interpenetrated in the warm gusts of spring; the soil was full of sunlight, and the sunlight full of red dust. The air one breathed was saturated with earthy smells, and the grass under foot had a reflection of the blue sky in it.” – Willa Cather
#teamrhinebeckequine #ambulatoryvet #equinevet #greengrass #hudsonvalley #healthy #horses #contentment

05/20/2022
Sleepy Foals

It's so exhausting to be a foal on #FoalFriday! Sound up for baby snores!

Another successful nurse mare grafting thatnks to Nursemares of the Northeast! This one for the very special Zephyr from...
05/19/2022

Another successful nurse mare grafting thatnks to Nursemares of the Northeast! This one for the very special Zephyr from Rosemary Farm.

A beautiful photo of our boy Zephyr bonding with the professional nurse mare, under the skilled care of Rhinebeck Equine. Big exhale.
For those who are concerned, his mother Twist is grazing peacefully on the mountain at home, with Tudor at her side. Both are getting what they need.
This is rescue. While yesterday the decision felt agonizing, today it is clear.

05/18/2022

#WellnessWednesday 🦄🥴 Ahhhh... Sara the horse is enjoying her acupuncture treatment with Dr. Rosenbaum so much that she is starting to fall asleep! #sigh #relaxation #preventativecare #wellness #acupunture #teamrhinebeckequine #ambulatoryveterinarian #equinevet Zephyr Farm

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26 Losee Ln
Rhinebeck, NY
12572

Telephone

(845) 876-7085

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Rhinebeck Equine is an exclusively equine practice located in Dutchess County in the Hudson River Valley about 120 miles north of NYC. The practice was founded in the 1940’s by Dr. Kenneth Gumaer, and began its equine focus in 1967, when Dr. Paul Mountan joined Dr. Ronnie Miller. Renamed Rhinebeck Equine in 1996, the practice’s veterinarians have been providing quality care to the equine population of New York’s Hudson Valley for over 50 years. This experienced and trusted practice has progressively grown into a comprehensive, caring medical and surgical center employing eight veterinarians, four intern veterinarians, and 28 support staff. A “State of the Art” referral hospital, completed in 2002, is staffed by two board certified equine surgeons, a board certified internal medicine specialist, interns, and a team of highly experienced support personnel. The hospital enables Rhinebeck Equine LLP to provide cutting edge treatment to its equine patients. Seven ambulatory veterinarians serving the surrounding area who will provide on the farm care from their fully equipped mobile units. The Rhinebeck Equine LLP team offers a full spectrum of services to horses of all breeds, providing comprehensive equine health care, including services in the areas of surgery, sport horse care, lameness evaluations, pre-purchase exams, reproduction, neonatal care, internal medicine, ophthalmology, dentistry and wellness care.

For more info, visit us at http://www.rhinebeckequine.com/

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Long vet day but an excellent one, thanks to Dr. Shores from Rhinebeck Equine, we got lots of annual vaccines completed, as well as exams on many equines, including Mira, Charlotte, Dante, Nala, Molly, Ruby, Moon Mist, and Gemma. There are always evolving care needs, and providing what our charges need both physically and emotionally is our primary daily goal.
Zephyr update; it’s been two weeks that he has been in the hospital, which was the right decision for all. He is doing very well, has had additional procedures to address a stubborn infection in that joint, and every day shows improvement. Sometimes a healing issue needs a few quiet days and other times it requires further action. Our distance from Rhinebeck Equine affects our decisions, as we don’t want a reoccurrence once he is home, so we are moving with caution. We will be visiting Zephyr on Friday, and will have new photos, and hopefully set a date for his trip home to Rosemary Farm. 🙂 (older photo from prior to his hospital stay)
Requested a new photo of our c**t Zephyr as he continues to improve at Rhinebeck Equine and received this. I think surgeon Dr. Nutt likes him. 🙂
Our little guy is a fighter! Update from the hospital this am. He is doing well overall but still hasn't nursed. They are hoping he will in the next few days. He has received stitches and has a feeding tube. For those of you wondering about his injuries, he started showing neurologic symptoms and ran himself into a few walls. We appreciate everyone's support and may need to continue to fundraise if his length of hospital stay increases. Thank you for all your prayers Rhinebeck Equine #babyboy #c**t #hospital #emergency #wildhorse
Today's One Minute Monday video is only half a minute, but everything we wanted to see this morning. Zephyr had a quiet weekend, and is improved following his surgery on Friday. We remain cautiously optimistic. So grateful for the world class care he is getting at Rhinebeck Equine! Enjoy this video of our boy getting a weigh in, under the tutelage of 'Nanny McPhee'. For the full story and to support his care, see link in Comments.
Good morning! Now that the dust has literally settled from our abrupt change in plans on Tuesday, I would like to answer some of the questions we are getting repeatedly, to help everyone understand our decision to separate Twist and her c**t Zephyr. We hope this gets us all on the same page (and helps us from typing the same answers over and over!) Q; Why couldn’t Twist stay with Zephyr? A; We had hoped that Twist would be able to raise her son, and if he was perfectly healthy he would still be with her at the Sanctuary. However, motherhood was not easy for her, we were trying to work through some of her signs of stress, and we had not talked about that publicly. This means it is more of a shock to our supporters. Things were not perfect behind barn doors. They weren’t awful either, and Twist was really trying to manage to trust the humans, protect her baby, also deal with the baby annoying her, and the stress of confinement. She was really really trying. When we determined that the baby needed hospital care, we recognized that it was unwise and unsafe to send them together. She would have hurt him in the trailer, spinning and panicking, and cannot safely be managed on a lead except by the few people she trusts, and even then it’s dodgy. She would have been traumatized by the event, and it would have been awful for them. The right decision was to get Zephyr the care he needed to save his life. Q; What was wrong with Zephyr? A; Zephyr is just a little dude, but his health was imperfect; he was over at the knees, got chilled and winded easily, then began showing signs of lameness. It was minor at first, and the crew here checked the usual possible issues, but all signs began to point to “joint ill”, or “septic joint”, an issue exclusive to foals. An infection takes hold in their body through many possible avenues, and settles in a joint area. If untreated it is fatal. It was clear by Tuesday that Zephyr needed emergency intervention, and we are grateful to Dr. Cassandra Shores for helping our team pinpoint the concern, as always. We got him to the skilled care of Rhinebeck Equine, and are thrilled he is responding so well to his treatments, and we feel he will make a full recovery. He may be there for a week. Q; Doesn’t Twist miss him? Was she very upset? A; The separation caused us great concern in advance. Our team got the baby efficiently out the door and into the trailer, and drove off. Twist did have a tranquilizer, and watched with some concern, but once he was gone, he was gone. As she continued to come out of the drugs, she ate, she wandered around, was not left alone in case she needed support. She never called for him. Not one neigh. We can try to understand but may not be able to. Twist may have never had a baby live, or she may have been used to them being taken away. The length of time, three weeks vs. six months, was probably not a factor to her. Her reaction is not what we would consider “normal”, but it supported our decision. Twist wanted to finally join the herd she had been watching, which she was able to do. We did discuss reuniting the pair, and what it would entail. Twist would have required milking (manually by a human) every two hours, around the clock. Aside from the practical consideration, it is not possible to milk that mare. Not even remotely a safe prospect. That would have also meant continuing her separation from the herd, and we didn’t know if Zephyr was going to survive. The separation is complete, and is best for all. Q; Will they ever be reunited? Would they still recognize each other? A; Those are good questions and we cannot say for certain. Twist recognizes the horses she grew up with, but may not recognize a foal that she gave birth to and only knew a short time. The baby has been introduced to a nurse mare who will care for him, and as time passes, he will accept her as his mother. Horses have a different brain then humans, and process differently. This is also new territory for us, so we will take it step by step. Q; What is a nursemare? Does she have a baby somewhere else? A; A nursemare is a mare that is producing milk, who enjoys being a mom. Renting out nursemares is a business. Some of these businesses get the mares pregnant, and pull off their own babies for profit, when they can make money sending out the nurse mare to cases like ours. This industry is one that rescues work against. However, with the advancement of science, a new business model has arisen, one that uses hormones and milking to keep their nursemares ready WITHOUT any babies created. As a rescue we are thrilled at this development. Our c**t Zephyr met the mare we have nicknamed “Nanny McPhee” who is one such mare, and she has accepted him, and will be taking care of him until he is ready to be weaned. She belongs to Nursemares of the Northeast, and we encourage those interested in learning more to read their page. Q; Isn’t this expensive? Is it worth it? A; Yes and yes. At Rosemary Farm Sanctuary, we endeavor to provide the proper medical and emotional care to support healthy equines. Breeding in particular can be expensive, and although as a rescue we do not breed, this pregnant mare and her foal were let down by humans. Our mission is to help equines in dire need, and protect them for life. This is only possible with our large and loving #rfnation helping us make the magic possible. Our costs for Zephyr are going to be approximately $10,800, but that is an estimate. Q; What happens next? A; First, we exhale. The decision we dreaded has worked out to the benefit of both the momma and her son. Each, needing rescue, now has the care best suited to each one. The mare Twist will not be subjected to breeding ever again, gets to get her figure back and be a horse. She is only 10 yo, so maybe there is further training in her future, if she enjoys it. The c**t Zephyr will continue to get the medical care he needs, and has a new nanny who will help him learn that humans can be good and kind. The pair will travel to Rosemary Farm Sanctuary next week, and she will live with us for six months. During that time there is lots of social time! Zephyr will grow up with care, love, and training, finally breaking the cycle his parents endured. I hope this answers your questions! For further info, or to help us,
A beautiful photo of our boy Zephyr bonding with the professional nurse mare, under the skilled care of Rhinebeck Equine. Big exhale. For those who are concerned, his mother Twist is grazing peacefully on the mountain at home, with Tudor at her side. Both are getting what they need. This is rescue. While yesterday the decision felt agonizing, today it is clear.
Another great success story, and great collaboration between our veterinarians, and our colleagues at Rhinebeck Equine! Felix and Oreo are now back in the care of their primary veterinarian, Dr. Cory Branscomb, and doing very well at home! #teamworkmakesthedreamwork #babydonkey #pinebushny #HorseDoctor
MJ experiencing some sunshine Rhinebeck Equine ❤️
Great work by Dr. Cory Branscomb, Dr. Lucia Aznar, and Dr. Chelsea Santa Lucia! While this mare ultimately did not accept her, baby MJ was able to find a mare with the help of the team at Rhinebeck Equine. We love being part of an amazing community of rescuers, veterinarians, and horse owners who come together to help animals in need! #horsedoctor #nursemare #foalingseason
Thank you to all who joined us virtually and in-person for tonight’s Equine Ask the Specialist (EATS) Dinner! Dr Lauren Pasch of Rhinebeck Equine lead a great discussion on endometritis. Thank you to NutraWorks Equine Zoetis EquineBreeder's Choice, Inc #aurorapharmaceuticals and of course our founding practices Millbrook Equine Equine Clinic at OakenCroft and #RhinebeckEquine for making these Continuing Education events possible!
Sending a big Thank You to everyone at Rhinebeck Equine for all the care, concern and professionalism you have shown to me, my family and most especially our beloved Shaina.